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  1. B. Short

    600 Years Ago There Were No Surnames

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    This is a post in an ongoing series exploring one family’s adventure through genealogical storytelling. The article below was written by Bri-Bri, and features lists and statements of gratitude.      The plan at the beginning of this year was to post an article by my dad and an article by myself every week this year. That should put us at about 24 or so if we had kept up with it, but we’re only up to about 10. But I’m still really excited!   I’m really happy doing this project. I’ve been re-reading some of the earlier posts in the series—in addition to being a contributor to this site, I also manage a lot of its web content, and I’ve been working...
  2. B. Short

    A Son Elaborates and Clarifies

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    Dad’s last post encapsulates a lot of what I loved listening to while he was doing all of that research. First, it included a lot of the crazy, insane-seeming, ultra-detail-oriented fine-tooth-comb gumshoeing that dad always seemed so good at. Sorting through handwritten census records to find a name that had been misspelled (sort of!) a […]
  3. B. Short

    A Dad Reflects on the Research Process

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    So at this point in our adventure we know that my wife’s ancestor Robert Morrison got a degree and a doctorate from the University of Edinburgh (so now we can refer to him as Dr. Robert Morrison). We also know that he was born in St. Thomas, USVI, which stands for United States Virgin Islands. […]
  4. B. Short

    A Son Remembers Scotland

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    I didn’t really know much about Scotland before we went there. Or I knew what everybody knew. I knew Braveheart and I knew Trainspotting and I knew, what, Macbeth, I guess. I had read Irvine Welsh’s breakout novel in college when it was recommended to me by a friend as “the greatest novel ever written.” After […]
  5. B. Short

    A Dad Solves One Mystery and Discovers Another

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    This post is continuing the story from Ed’s last post. Our family headed to Edinburgh, Scotland, for a two-week vacation partly to find out if my wife’s ancestor Robert Morrison had a bust in the lobby of the University of Edinburgh. The bust’s existence was according to family lore. The 1891 Winnipeg Canada census showed […]

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